By Barrington M. Salmon -Contributing Writer-

Missing girls stir renewed activism in D.C.

WASHINGTON—For years, activists like Natalie and Derrica Wilson, Tina Frundt, Henderson Long and other concerned D.C. residents labored with little recognition or notice trying to bring attention to the hidden crisis of missing Black and Brown men, women and children.

All too often, the mainstream media ignored the plight of anguished parents and family members, while focusing the spotlight and attention on White girls and women who were missing or had been kidnapped.

Then someone sent out a tweet recently claiming erroneously that 14 girls had gone missing in 24 hours. The recent tweet spread like wildfire and was retweeted 47,000 times.

This fanned concerns and triggered the furor in the District of Columbia around the issue of missing Black and Latino girls. Entertainment and sports stars such as Sean Combs, Nicki Minaj and Meek Mill, actresses Sanaa Lathan and Howard University graduate Taraji P. Henson, rapper and actor LL Cool J, the Washington Wizards’ phenom John Wall expressed concern about what’s going on. » FULL STORY

Black women still stalked by HIV and AIDS

By Charlene Muhammad -National Correspondent-

Statistics indicate U.S. HIV infection rates have declined, but Black women are still disproportionately affected by the disease compared to their female counterparts. According to the Centers for Disease Control, rates of HIV infection among Black women fell 42 percent from 2005 to 2014.


Black Caucus meets with President Trump on public policy in first and unpopular step

By Richard B. Muhammad - Editor

WASHINGTON - When members of the Congressional Black Caucus met with President Trump, he suggested possible monthly meetings. Black Caucus Chairman Cedric Richmond felt meeting every 60 days might be overkill, but there was talk of meeting every other month.


Celebrating the life of Richard Muhammad

By Charlene Muhammad -National Correspondent-

LOS ANGELES—Joy and pain dwelled on the faces of family and friends who filled the Harrison Ross Mortuary to celebrate the life of Richard Joseph Muhammad who returned to Allah on March 1, 2017.


Fake Drug Stings Targeting Blacks And Latinos Scheduled For Hearings

By Starla Muhammad -Managing Editor-

CHICAGO—Attorneys representing dozens of Black and Latino male defendants charged in federal drug conspiracy and gun cases, after being snared in fake drug house sting operations, are heading to federal court early next month in a battle to have the charges dismissed.


Mass Incarceration And The Failure Of Black School Children

By Nisa Islam Muhammad -Staff Writer-

WASHINGTON—When “Debra,” not her real name, left to do a mandatory four-year minimum sentence for drug possession, she left her five-year-old daughter with her mother. It was her only option for care. Debra’s mom would be responsible for everything.


Missing girls stir renewed activism in D.C.

By Barrington M. Salmon -Contributing Writer-

WASHINGTON—For years, activists like Natalie and Derrica Wilson, Tina Frundt, Henderson Long and other concerned D.C. residents labored with little recognition or notice trying to bring attention to the hidden crisis of missing Black and Brown men, women and children.

All too often, the mainstream media ignored the plight of anguished parents and family members, while focusing the spotlight and attention on White girls and women who were missing or had been kidnapped.

Then someone sent out a tweet recently claiming erroneously that 14 girls had gone missing in 24 hours. The recent tweet spread like wildfire and was retweeted 47,000 times.

This fanned concerns and triggered the furor in the District of Columbia around the issue of missing Black and Latino girls. Entertainment and sports stars such as Sean Combs, Nicki Minaj and Meek Mill, actresses Sanaa Lathan and Howard University graduate Taraji P. Henson, rapper and actor LL Cool J, the Washington Wizards’ phenom John Wall expressed concern about what’s going on.


Black women still stalked by HIV and AIDS

By Charlene Muhammad -National Correspondent-

Statistics indicate U.S. HIV infection rates have declined, but Black women are still disproportionately affected by the disease compared to their female counterparts. According to the Centers for Disease Control, rates of HIV infection among Black women fell 42 percent from 2005 to 2014.


Black Caucus meets with President Trump on public policy in first and unpopular step

By Richard B. Muhammad - Editor

WASHINGTON - When members of the Congressional Black Caucus met with President Trump, he suggested possible monthly meetings. Black Caucus Chairman Cedric Richmond felt meeting every 60 days might be overkill, but there was talk of meeting every other month.


Mike Brown vindicated?

By J.A. Salaam -Staff Writer-

FERGUSON, Mo.—A new documentary about the life of Mike Brown and the struggle of his parents to get justice for the untimely killing of their 18-yearold son has sparked renewed controversy.


Honoring Elijah: C.R.O.E.’s Work Bring Honor And Friendships In All Walks Of Life

By Tariqah Shakir-Muhammad -The Final Call-

CHICAGO—Co-founders Munir Muhammad, Shahid Muslim, and Halif Muhammad of C.R.O.E (Coalition for the Remembrance of Elijah Muhammad) recently opened the auditorium for a memorable reception, fundraiser and tribute to the Most Honorable Elijah Muhammad and his work in uplifting the Black man and woman.


Winnie Mandela is hospitalized but doing well - spokesman says

By GIN

(GIN)—Veteran activist Winnie Madikizela-Mandela is in good spirits while she remains hospitalized for observation, her spokesperson Victor Dlamini told News24 over the recent weekend.


Africa still cursed by glut of small arms

By Jehron Muhammad -Contributing Writer-

The International Red Cross has determined small arms are the world’s principal cause of death and conflict. “Small/light arms are cheap and portable, and are used by all combatants—state militaries, militias, and insurgents.”


Report from African Union Summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

By Jehron Muhammad -Contributing Writer-

Chadian foreign affairs minister Moussa Faki Mahamat was elected new chairperson of the African Union Commission. The election was held in the AU’s headquarters in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.


A President’s Last Act: Dual Citizenship For Africans In The Diaspora

By A. Akbar Muhammad

On January 6, a day before the West African Nation of Ghana changed leadership, I was blessed to receive my Ghana citizenship along with Bro. Earl 3X Reddix from Las Vegas.


Looking Ahead For The Motherland In 2017

By Jehron Muhammad

The need for industrial and infrastructure development in Africa is sacrosanct. The outgoing African Union Commission chairperson, Dr. Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, said the AU’s move to secure “visa-freeentry for all Africans” is a step in that direction.


Black business group, Black banks making Black history with economic justice

By Hazel Trice Edney

It is the number one reason that Black-owned businesses fail: Simply put—not enough money and not enough places to get it.


From banks to beauty products, the #BuyBlack movement is real

By Stacy M. Brown -NNPA Newswire-

As the holiday season moves into full swing, the #BuyBlack campaign has led many to imagine what would happen if African Americans— the largest consumer group of color in the United States with an estimated $1.2 trillion in spending power— routinely demonstrated allegiance to the 2.6 million Black-owned businesses that exist in America.


Will victims in bank scandal get their day in court?

By Nisa Islam Muhammad -Staff Writer-

Victims of the Wells Fargo banking scandal will get justice and have their day in court if new legislation introduced earlier this month passes.


Christians, Muslims unite on economic venture in Atlanta

By Kenetta Muhammad And Karriemmah Muhammad

ATLANTA—The Atlanta Local Organizing Committee (LOC) and 10,000 Fearless Men and Women Headquarters of the South established a combined economic development venture in Atlanta called Blue Seas Express & Catering.


Can We Rebuild Black Wall Street?

By James Clingman -Guest Columnist-

Black Wall Street was burned to the ground in 1921 by a White mob. The Greenwood District, located in the northern section of Tulsa, Oklahoma, was once called “Negro Wall Street,” and “Little Africa.” It was home to hundreds of Black owned businesses and sat on valuable land desired by White oil speculators.


'We Are Victims of Genocide'

By The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan

The biological pandemic “AIDS” has a bleak, ominous—and questionable—history, when we consider a [June 9, 1969] “Subcommittee of The Committee on Appropriations House of Representatives Hearing” which contained the testimony of Dr. Donald M. MacArthur of the Army Advanced Research Project Agency, who testified on “Chemical and Biological Warfare.” » CONTINUE

God Is Using The Forces Of Nature To Humble America

By The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan

We’ve arrived at a time when what people have sown, all of us, we have to reap. America has sown some terrible things and this is a time of reaping. That’s why I know that the present powers don’t love the American people. They don’t even love their own children. » CONTINUE

The Abuse of the Female

By The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan

We have to make the change within ourselves, then we can force a change in others; but the change does not start with the enemy. The change starts with us. The Holy Qur'an says, "God will never change the condition of a people until they change within themselves."

» CONTINUE

Have No Fear for The Future, Part II

By The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan

Brothers, sisters, do you think you’re a real American citizen? You really don’t know, do you? The Constitution never was a guarantee for you. I love the way you defend it; it’s such a magnificent document—and nobody defends it better than the slave who it don’t even apply to. You are so exquisite in your defense (“We are Americans, too!”). Well, tell that to Trump. » CONTINUE

'Have No Fear For The Future: The Future Is Ours!' Part 2

By The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan

When I sat with President Obama (he was Senator Obama then), he said these words to me in the National House: "Brother Farrakhan ... The Black vote in Chicago caused me to win Chicago, but the downstate (White) vote is what made me a U.S. senator." » CONTINUE

Have No Fear for The Future: The Future is Ours

By The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan

I am here to announce today the end of his world, and the beginning of a brand-new reality: That all human beings will enjoy peace, freedom, justice and equality under the rule and the guidance of Allah (God). » CONTINUE

A Saviour Is Born for the Black Man and Woman of America

By the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan

Have you noticed how every Black leader who wants to unite Black people but is not made by White people, they reject him for you? When White people reject him, you reject him. We rejected Marcus Garvey? We rejected Noble Drew Ali. We rejected Malcolm X. We rejected Elijah Muhammad. » CONTINUE

Message To The Afrikan Black Coalition Conference

By The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan

Brothers and sisters, you are so great, that’s why the enemy doesn’t want you to know yourself! Because if you knew yourself, and would try to be yourself rather than being a replica of your enemy. We could be free overnight. » CONTINUE

Accepting Responsibility to Build Our Community

By the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan

Now the killings have increased in all the major cities of America and leading Black thinkers are now calling for the National Guard. Some people say, “Farrakhan you need to have another March.” No that is over, I will never go back to Washington like that ever again,  In fact, we do not have time. » CONTINUE

Iranian Journalist Nader Talebzadeh Interviews The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan

By The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan

This “religiosity” is not the standard by which true men of God are measured. In all the rituals that Islam has, deeply imbedded in those rituals are principles of truth. And sometimes we get lost in the religiosity; we get lost in the “symbol,” but we miss the substance of the truth. » CONTINUE